How to Protect Your Social Media Accounts

We can’t exist in this world without social media. As a result, 50 percent of the world’s population uses social media in some capacity. It’s vital to determine how to safeguard our social networks from hackers and intrusions because of all the sharing, talking, and info traveling between family and friends on social media. So is it hard to protect our social media accounts or easy? Let’s talk about how we can protect our social media accounts.

protect your social media accounts

How to Protect Your Social Media Accounts

1. Secure Password

Keep your passwords strong and unique.

To begin protecting yourself, you need strong passwords for each of your online accounts, each one different from the others. There are certain steps to hide your IP. For instance, For those of us who have a large number of accounts, remembering many strong and unique passwords can be a daunting effort.

Attackers enjoy this although they may use the same password to access multiple usernames at the same time. Alternatively, use a master password to automatically generate and store different passwords for you. One will be included in any cybersecurity programme.

2. Go Private Mode

Facebook, Instagram, and other social networking platforms allow you to hide your identity and activities from the general public. By selecting this option, you can restrict the rest of the internet from seeing what you do, say, or post.

3. Don’t Accept The Strangers Request

Examine the notifications you are sent with a critical eye. They might even be a spam bot aimed to collect personally identifiable information for data breaches or a fake account intended to misinform people. Out-and-out strangers could be more than just strangers. There’s no shortage of them. In fact, in just the third quarter of 2021, Facebook removed 1.8 billion fraudulent accounts. Refuse to comply with their requests.

4. Don’t Blindly Checking In

That it’s a well-known saying is not by accident. When posting on a “vanishing” app, like Snapchat, or on your own personal network, keep in mind that your content can be preserved and re-shared. It’s just a matter of snapping a picture. Don’t upload it if you do not want to see something out there permanently or not.

5. Observe Phishing Scams

However, phishing attempts occur frequently on social networking sites, where we’ve become more familiar with the cautions regarding fake attempts. The principles are the same. Any offers you receive via immediate or direct messaging should not be followed. In addition, keep your private details near to hand. Likewise, refrain from disclosing your email or other personal information. So-called “quiz” blogs and web pages can be dirty tricks to acquire confidential info that can be used in an assault.

That it’s a well-known saying is not by accident. When posting on a “vanishing” app, like Snapchat, or on your own personal network, keep in mind that your content can be preserved and re-shared. It’s just a matter of snapping a picture. Don’t upload it if you do not want to see something out there permanently or not.

6. Observe Scams Types

It’s a sad fact that people can con you on social networking. Ads, postings, and even direct messages can be used by scammers to trick you into handing up your social media details, funds, or both in an attempt to scam you. To discover further about questionnaires and other fraudsters, visit social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.

7. Cautiously Observe Tags

Articles that have been marked with a customer’s username are viewable by them on networks like Facebook. Check your settings page and ensure that you have the most influence over where and how your tags are being used by other people. As a result, you’ll be able to keep track of where and how you’ve been referred to by others.

8. Protect your Gadgets & Yourself

When you’re on social networks, it’s a good idea to use antivirus software to prevent you from visiting websites that lead to malware, spyware, and other hazards. It may also safeguard and manage your private information, such as your inbox and Social Security Number (SSN), as well as your account numbers and credit cards. The prevalence of fraudulent activity today necessitates the use of security software.

Posted by
Dharmesh Donda

iStaunch is written by Dharmesh Donda, an avid Internet geek, IT professional since 2012. Have been in IT industry for more than a decade, and currently doing management and consulting work have taken a plunge into entrepreneurship.

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